Photo 1 Apr 1 note fromexilegrowman:

House on Haunted Hill (1959)
Vincent Price is the man.  He is one of the great all-time suspense/horror actors also.  I dare to say that this film may rank up in one of his best horror films as well.  This is a devilishly delightful tale of intrigue and horror.  Unlike its 1999 remake, this film does not settle for cheap thrills but instead plays on the insecurities of the audience.  We are the ones that are placing our own value of horror on the events of the movie, because not one ghost, ghoul or long-legged beastie appears in the film.
The setup for the film is great where Price’s character has specifically invited certain people to a haunted house party and if they make it through the night then he will pay them 10,000 dollars each.  The absolute genius of the film is the nastiness and seething hatred that is apparent between Price and his wife.  The dialogue is ridiculously sharp and cutting between these lovers.  And, in the end, we find that the explanation for the night lies exactly where the film started, in the midst of a lover’s spat.  This is an exceptional example of an early horror movie that is smart and full of suspense and tension.

fromexilegrowman:

House on Haunted Hill (1959)

Vincent Price is the man.  He is one of the great all-time suspense/horror actors also.  I dare to say that this film may rank up in one of his best horror films as well.  This is a devilishly delightful tale of intrigue and horror.  Unlike its 1999 remake, this film does not settle for cheap thrills but instead plays on the insecurities of the audience.  We are the ones that are placing our own value of horror on the events of the movie, because not one ghost, ghoul or long-legged beastie appears in the film.

The setup for the film is great where Price’s character has specifically invited certain people to a haunted house party and if they make it through the night then he will pay them 10,000 dollars each.  The absolute genius of the film is the nastiness and seething hatred that is apparent between Price and his wife.  The dialogue is ridiculously sharp and cutting between these lovers.  And, in the end, we find that the explanation for the night lies exactly where the film started, in the midst of a lover’s spat.  This is an exceptional example of an early horror movie that is smart and full of suspense and tension.

Video 30 Mar 269,928 notes

tyleroakley:

mindswondering:

some drag queens are a much better influence in young girls than some teen queen pop stars out there.

this was beautiful as shit.

(Source: hmspoofta)

Video 30 Mar 58,495 notes
Video 23 Mar 739 notes

(Source: mtvnews)

Photo 23 Mar 50,016 notes

(Source: mutisija)

Video 23 Mar 829,819 notes

dirrtyflowerchild:

all-about-living-up:

adeventute time helped me get over my last breakup no fuckin joke i shit u not

literally adventure time knows their shit

(Source: pretendplaytime)

via .
Video 2 Mar 216,740 notes

(Source: japanlove)

via LolTime!.
Video 2 Mar 364,916 notes

alter-of-the-sky:

This deserves more notes

(Source: sandandglass)

Photo 14 Feb 112,694 notes

(Source: bookmad)

Quote 14 Feb 25,163 notes

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

— 

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

Yeah, my inner life today is no richer than it was when I worked at Steak ‘n Shake.

I don’t think we should measure the value of a person’s professional life by whether they have esteemed or lucrative work. The best formulation of professional value I’ve come across is from Tim O’Reilly: “Do things that need doing.” 

Stocking shelves? Needs doing. Serving food? Needs doing. Collecting garbage? Needs doing. Editing wikipedia pages? Needs doing. Figuring out how to maximize fees on checking accounts? Doesn’t need doing. Engaging trolls on the Internet? Doesn’t need doing. Volunteering at animal shelters? Needs doing.

Ultimately, for me at least, the measure of work’s value is not expressed best by money or love. The question is whether someone that needs to be done is getting done.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

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